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The Green Sheet Online Edition

August 12, 2019 • Issue 19:08:01

News Briefs

The Green Sheet News Briefs

Trustwave identifies, remediates Uniguest kiosk vulnerability

Trustwave, a managed security service provider, disclosed that it completed a six-month remediation process with Uniguest following the discovery of a software flaw in one of Uniguest's older kiosks.

Originally identified by Adrian Pruteanu, senior security researcher at Trustwave SpiderLabs, during routine penetration testing, the vulnerability had the potential to expose guest information and log-in credentials to hackers, if left untreated. Uniguest deploys self-attended solutions in hotel lobbies across North America. The machines are centrally managed and run a locked-down version of Windows that restricts users to basic tasks.

Facebook to pay hefty price for lax privacy controls

The Federal Trade Commission slapped social media giant Facebook with a huge fine as part of a long-running investigation into the company’s privacy practices. According to reports in several media outlets, including the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, the FTC voted to approve a $5 billion settlement of claims arising from the so-called Cambridge Analytica scandal.

The settlement, which would be the largest ever involving the FTC, still must be approved by the Department of Justice. The FTC declined to respond to The Green Sheet’s request for confirmation. But Facebook made clear in an earnings report earlier this year that it expected the FTC’s investigation would result in a $3 billion to $5 billion hit.

MWAA 2019 explores changing payments ecosystem

More than 700 payments industry attendees convened July 16 to 18, 2019, at Chicago’s Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel for the 17th anniversary of the Midwest Acquirers Association Conference. A festive opening night party filled with games and cotton candy reflected a buoyant industry that continually adapts to changing trends in consumer behavior, regulatory initiatives and emerging technologies. Keynote speakers and panelists examined integrated payments from multiple perspectives.

Lawmakers press Fed on faster payments

The Federal Reserve has been a staunch advocate of faster payments, having convened an inter-industry task force in 2015 to devise a road map for a faster payments system with real-time settlement capabilities. The Fed indicated it doesn't necessarily want to be in charge of running a new faster payments system, however.

Now, there's a push in Washington for the Fed to take charge, with some positioning the move as beneficial to consumers and small businesses. A group of lawmakers introduced legislation in both the House and the Senate that would instruct the Fed to build and operate a real-time payment system. The Payment Modernization Act of 2019 was authored by Sens. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Reps. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, D-Ill.

Capital One, Sephora fall victim to data breaches

As the recent data breaches of Capital One and Sephora make clear, global enterprises make compelling targets for today's increasingly stealthy and nimble cybercriminals. News media outlets have been playfully attacking the companies' taglines, reframing Capital One's "what's in your wallet?" (a hacker!) and Sephora's "let's beauty together," (You first!).

Colin Bastable, CEO at Lucy Security, pointed out that data breach victims will need additional protections beyond the usual 12-month credit monitoring that compromised companies provide. "The Dark Web probably knows more about most people in North America than their governments will publicly admit to," he said. "Employers need to protect themselves by ensuring that their employees are security aware." end of article

Following are excerpts from news stories recently posted under Breaking Industry News on our home page. For links to these and other full news stories, please visit www.greensheet.com/breakingnews.php?flag=previous_breaking_news.

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