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Table of Contents

Lead Story

Looking ahead, moving forward

News

Industry Update

Tie vote curtails online gambling amendment

Visa brings relief to the pump

Trillions predicted for self-service kiosks

Heartland crowned best in sales

Chase gives merchants a heads up

AmEx to get doozie of a settlement

Features

Scammers on the hook: Q&A with the FTC

PCI for the little guy

Understanding Credit Card Interchange Fees in
Card-Not-Present Environments

Michael E. Shatz

ISOMetrics:

Views

Selling on spouse power

Biff Matthews
CardWare International

Building business at the curb

Bulent Ozayaz
VeriFone

Placed any ATMs lately?

Ray Varcho
WRG Services Inc.

Exit portfolio, many offramps

Adam Atlas
Attorney at Law

Education

Street SmartsSM:
The sky is falling if you believe it is

Jason Felts
Advanced Merchant Services

Exit portfolio, many offramps

Adam Atlas
Attorney at Law

Merchants don't bail on added value

Christian Murray
Global eTelecom Inc.

Expert adviser: Value add incarnate

Daniel Wadleigh
Marketing Consultant

The corps of explosive growth

Curt Hensley
CSH Consulting

Change, a rewarding discomfort

Jeff Fortney
Clearent LLC

Exit portfolio, many offramps

Adam Atlas
Attorney at Law

Expert adviser: Value add incarnate

Daniel Wadleigh
Marketing Consultant

The corps of explosive growth

Curt Hensley
CSH Consulting

Change, a rewarding discomfort

Jeff Fortney
Clearent LLC

Company Profile

SIA Enterprises LLC

New Products

Swipe, print, done

P25-M Portable Thermal Receipt Printer
Blue Bamboo

Check ease in the back office

EZDeposit
Company: EZCheck

Inspiration

P-R-E-P that portfolio

Miscellaneous

POScript

Departments

Forum

Resource Guide

Datebook

Skyscraper Ad

The Green Sheet Online Edition

July 14, 2008  •  Issue 08:07:01

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Change, a rewarding discomfort

By Jeff Fortney

As this presidential election year progresses, there is one word we are sure to hear often: change. We will hear it from the candidates and their surrogates - all claiming their version of change is the best.

In the payments world, change is a constant. We see it in interchange rates, in the need for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard compliance, in terminal usage and in the needs of our merchant customers.

Most of us handle new developments in these areas naturally. We may complain, but we adapt; we have no choice.

When it comes to personal change, however, we all resist.

If you are currently exceeding all your expectations and have no reason to improve your sales, read no further: You don't need to change. But the odds are you will read on.

It is safe to assume that, in today's market, all of us are seeking improvement in our performance. Yet, when this requires deviating from our norms, we hesitate. We continue in the old ways and hope the market will adapt to us.

The truth is growth will only come through true, meaningful change. Until we accept this premise, we are not likely to reach new heights. Historically, those in our industry who don't adapt and change have lost market share. Therefore, change isn't just desirable; it's a necessity.

People fear change for three primary reasons. It:

  1. Is painful
  2. Requires effort
  3. Means leaving your comfort zone

It's easy to see why change is avoided.

On top of that, even those who overcome inertia and fear and make a commitment to change may not fully understand what in their business practices actually needs adjustment.

Step it up

Here are some easy steps to help you identify areas to improve:

Goal setting, action and attitude are interrelated. True transformation requires all three. Changing one area without adapting the other two won't improve your results. Just adjusting your goal but not addressing your action plan or attitude won't improve your production.

And improving your attitude alone (without addressing action plan issues or unrealistic goals) will only result in lackluster business and further damage to your attitude.

Change isn't easy; neither is going to the dentist. We tend to avoid both equally. Yet, when we have a serious tooth problem, the temporary pain of treatment is better than the long-term affects of not addressing the issue.

The same goes for change. Think of it as treating an abscessed tooth. Deal with the necessary pain, for in the end, your smile will be much better.

Jeff Fortney is Director of Business Development with Clearent LLC. He has more than 12 years experience in the payments industry. Contact him at jeff@clearent.com or 972-618-7340.

Notice to readers: These are archived articles. Contact names or information may be out of date. We regret any inconvenience.

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Spotlight Innovators:

North American Bancard | Harbortouch | USAePay | IRISCRM.COM | Humboldt Merchant Services