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Table of Contents

Lead Story

Redemption in recession

News

Industry Update

Companion bill targets interchange fees

And in this corner: Discover

MasterCard IPO soaring

FTC disconnects alleged phone card scam

Prepaid Expo coming to Caesars

Features

AgenTalkSM:
Neal Tichelkamp

Select-A-Branch grows ATM network

Travis K. Kircher
ATMmarketplace.com

Industry Leader

Jim Baumgartner –
Born to do business

Views

Honoring early mavericks

Patti Murphy
The Takoma Group

Education

Street SmartsSM:
Add value to enhance your value

Jason Felts
Advanced Merchant Services

POS as a second language

Dale S. Laszig
DSL Direct LLC

Portfolio sold: How much goes to Uncle Sam?

Michael Laird
Certified Public Accountant

Marketing mishaps to avoid

Nancy Drexler
SignaPay Ltd.

Little to fear in buyer's market

Lane Gordon
MerchantPortfolios.com

Company Profile

PayProTec

New Products

FACTA the future

Safe2Change
ID Insight Inc.

Protect data with hidden shield

VeriShield Protect
VeriFone

Inspiration

Dump perfectionism, do reality check

Departments

Forum

Resource Guide

Datebook

A Bigger Thing

The Green Sheet Online Edition

June 23, 2008  •  Issue 08:06:02

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Inspiration

Dump perfectionism, do reality check

The thing that is really hard, and really amazing, is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.
ľAnna Quindlen

By nature, most ISOs and merchant level salespeople (MLSs) are go-getters. In the rough and tumble payments industry, sales reps have to be hard on themselves to meet quotas and make a living.

Under constant time pressures and needing to always be at their best, the feet on the street expect to close every sale and give every merchant his or her undivided attention - to make the most of every minute of every work day.

Although aspiring to perfection is a noble goal, none of us will ever attain it. We are human, after all, fallible and mistake prone. It is impossible to meet all our goals all the time. By setting unattainable objectives, we set ourselves up for failure each and every day.

Take a look at your goals

Examine your professional expectations. Chances are you could use a reality check. After all, setting and reaching a goal of a 50 percent increase in residuals over a year's time is better than setting and falling far short of a goal of 100 percent growth.

What follows are examples of unattainable goals and their more practical and attainable counterparts:

Take small steps

Striving for perfection is not a bad thing. In fact, our industry thrives on hard work and perseverance and going that extra mile for our customers. We need goals to motivate us and help us achieve our objectives.

However, goals need to be realistic and practical. We need to make room for the mistakes that we will surely make. Most importantly, when we slip up, we need to forgive ourselves and move on.

But if we set realistic goals and then meet them, we can raise the bar a little higher next time. By getting better through small increments, we may one day attain that level of near-perfection we sought all along.

Notice to readers: These are archived articles. Contact names or information may be out of date. We regret any inconvenience.

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Spotlight Innovators:

North American Bancard | USAePay | Impact Paysystems | Electronic Merchant Systems | Board Studios