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The Green SheetGreen Sheet

The Green Sheet Online Edition

April 13, 2009 • Issue 09:04:01

Inspiration

See it, believe it

As an ISO or merchant level salesperson, you devote time and effort to setting goals, making lists and keeping upbeat through the frustrations and triumphs of a typical workday. But have you ever truly visualized what you want?

When was the last time you pictured the future you passionately desire and literally saw the success you crave?

Visualization focuses the mind on a goal at hand. Maybe it's a monthly quota of new merchant accounts or a certain residual level you expect to achieve in a year's time.

Writing goals down, along with the steps necessary to attain them, is an important process.

Research indicates this alone makes it far more likely you'll get what you want in life. But add visualization, and you'll reach your destination faster.

Visualization is simply creating pictures in your mind. However, effective visualization requires time and concerted effort - two things you may feel you don't have, considering your workload and commitments.

But it's when you feel most harried that you need to see clearly what you desire.

You may feel you cannot determine what runs through your mind, visual or otherwise, especially when you feel stressed. But you have more power to determine this than you may realize.

Those were the days

Do you remember daydreaming as a child or teenager? Your mind was filled with dreams and goals that were more flights of fancy than practical or logical pursuits. But you didn't consider that. How many times did your teachers or parents ask you where your head was?

You were dreaming of playing third base for the Baltimore Orioles, or you were the lead singer at a sold out Madison Square Garden concert or you were at the senior prom with the homecoming queen or king. The point is you actually saw it through your mind's eye. You were there. You felt the rush of the crowd's applause, you could smell the fresh cut grass of the ballpark and you could see yourself dancing with the most popular person in school.

Do you feel you have lost that ability? You haven't. And now you can direct it toward realistic goals. Devote time to practicing visualization, and soon enough you will be able to vividly picture yourself moving through close after close, building a multimillion dollar portfolio. But begin with something small. Then build your momentum.

Eye on the prize

For example, take a picture of a busy commercial area where several merchants you want to board are doing business. Now, set aside at least 15 minutes. Look at the picture. Next, close your eyes and visualize meeting your targeted merchants.

Walk each of them through your sales pitch. See their positive reactions, watch yourself nail the closings, and revel in follow-up visits with your new customers and the residual streams coming from their merchant accounts.

Repeat this process several times. Get in the habit of doing this several times a day as you work toward your goal. And post the snapshot you took where you'll see it often.

It's important to focus on the task at hand. Wanting a fancy car, a spacious new home or a first-class vacation is all well and good, and imagining such things is likely to help you attain them.

But don't forget to picture yourself succeeding in your chosen profession - step by step. This can lead to the financial windfall that will make your dream purchases a reality.

If you encounter setbacks landing merchants, remember to use visualization. It will lift your spirits and keep you focused on your goals. While your goals and accompanying visualizations will change over time, the things you envision must always be meaningful to you.

Use images that inspire and empower you both when you are doing well and when you aren't quite hitting your stride. Practice visualization consistently, and you just may find yourself scaling heights you once thought were Olympian. end of article

Notice to readers: These are archived articles. Contact names or information may be out of date. We regret any inconvenience.

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